Poetry Friday September 27, 2019

Poetry Friday is hosted today by Carol Varsalona at Beyond LiteracyLink. Although retired, Carol continues to be actively involved in literacy development in multiple ways - writing poetry being only one of them. At her site today she is embracing summer in images and poems from around the world. Go over there and check it out. Don't forget to check out the links to other participants sharing poetry today.



In 1958, the year I turned five, my family joined other relatives on a logging and homesteading adventure into the Pine River region of Northern British Columbia. I've been writing bits about that experience off and on for ages, but needed motivation to become truly focused. I committed to sharing a bit publicly every week so that I wouldn't give up. This is the last poem in these drafts for now. I have appreciated all the feedback, questions, and advice I have received from all of the Poetry Friday community.

Now it's time to make use your gifts and advice and start reworking it all.

When I started thinking about where I might send this off to in order to publish it, I discovered that many people don't want to look at work if any version of it has been published in any format, including on a blog. I wish I had known this before I started. Is there a way around this?

ENDING

Just like that,
it was over.

unlike that of
a perfectly hewn tree,
our family’s trajectory
had not fallen true

Daddy survived,
but had to use a wheelchair
for what remained of his life

never accepted it
just got better at coping

the future our family faced
would prove to be
more challenging than
those few months in the north

the horrors ahead
made those hardships
seem idyllic

shaped us all up
into different kinds of people

but we would survive

there really wasn’t any other option

Here are links to previous poems in this collection.

Leaving
Characters
Journey
Arrival
Preparedness
Ready and Willing
Larder
Laundry
Diaper Duty
Skunk Trouble
Working
Pawns
Crossing
Bath Time
invincible 
Explorer
Time For Fun
First Snow

Miserable Physics

Difficult Decision
Return

#IMWAYR Septermber 23, 2019

#IMWAYR time again, when readers share what they have been reading and find out what others have been up to in the past week. Kathryn hosts the adult version of this meme at Book Date. Jen at Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers host the kidlit rendition. Whatever you are looking forward to in your next great read, these are fabulous places to start your search.



I am trying hard to get on top of all the Netgalley titles I signed up to read and review. When I go to the site I am like a kid in a toy store at Christmas time. I want to read scores of them so I sign up for too many. I'm left trying to figure out how I am ever going to get to all of them. On top of this, a couple of days ago I got an email that Gae Polisner's new book, Jack Kerouac is Dead to Me, is available to read. Of course I squealed in delight and added it to my list. 

We are here at our Oliver home to attend the funeral of one of my Uncles today. It's a sad, but wonderful time as he had a rich and rewarding life. I am looking forward to connecting with my cousins and other family friends. I will do my best to respond to everyone's blog posts this week, but can't guarantee how that will work out. We are heading home on Tuesday to celebrate my son's birthday and then I work the rest of the week. 


BLOG POSTS LAST WEEK

The House at the End of the Road by Kari Rust

Just Lucky by Melanie Florence

Poetry Friday September 20, 2019

PICTURE BOOKS


4 stars
The Toy Brother by William Steig

I needed a picture book to teach the basics of a story - setting, characters, and problem. (The classroom teacher had left one of those paper cubes to fill out.) The gender norms in this are a bit dated, but it’s still a classic full of all kinds of weirdness and humour. It fit my need perfectly. Magnus Bede is an apothecary. When he and his wife, Eutilda, are away, his older son, Yorick, ends up disobeying him and while experimenting in the lab, shrinks himself. The younger son, Charles, finally has Yorick’s undivided attention, but It looks like Yorrick might be stuck that way forever! Don't you just adore these names!


4 stars
The Bus Ride by Marianne Dubuc

Marianne Dubuc is brilliant. Her books make me think hard, but this one was uniquely intriguing. A lot is going on in this little girl's journey to her grandmother's house. I loved that she ended up making friends with the wolf. I must have gone through the book four times before making the connection between the newspaper and and what was happening on the bus.
Marianne Dubuc is Canadian. 🍁


4 stars
Lucy and Company by Marianne Dubuc

I’m automatically hooked by any book that has a map on the opening pages, so I was already disposed to love this one. It turned out to be enchanting even without the map.
It's composed of three short stories perfect for beginning readers.
In the first we are introduced to the characters. Lucy climbs a tree to have her snack. She is soon joined by Marcel, the mouse, Henry, a rabbit, Dot, the turtle, and Adrian, a snail. They discover that sharing snacks is fun.
The Treasure Map ends up in with a birthday party for Henry.
In The Hatchlings, Adrian discovers eggs. When they hatch into little chicks, they follow him but when he can’t keep them warm, the group snuggle the little chicks into Anton the bear’s fur.
Marianne Dubuc is Canadian. 🍁


5 stars
The House at the End of the Road by Kari Rust

Old people are pretty cool characters in Kari Rust's The House at the End of the Road. Some of us already know this, but you can't have too many reminders of how important relationships between the oldest and the youngest of us are. This book is a hybrid - a cross between a graphic novel and a picture book. 
Kari Rust is a Canadian author from my city. 🍁

GRAPHIC NOVELS


4 stars
Operatic by Kyo Maclear

I sure wish I had had a music teacher like Mr. K. He introduces his students to a gamut of musical genres and encourages them to find a song that is them - one they feel at home in. His room has an empty desk. In other classrooms the desk would have been removed but in here it is moved to a corner, but still there reminding students of Luka and what happened to him.
Charlie (Charlotte), the protagonist, has some solid friends and a crush on one of her classmates, Emile. She wonders and worries about Luka. When she is exposed to the art of Maria Callas, Charlie discovers the song and music that becomes 'home' to her. Inspired by Callas' story, she begins to make changes in her own life.
The art is gorgeous. Different time periods and different places are offset in different colours. The yellowish background is connected to school and home. The blue background refers to the past. The sections in red deal with the life and times of Maria Callas.
I appreciate the diversity in this book. It's there in the ethnicity and gender norms of the students and in the music. I love that Maria Callas is featured in a graphic novel for teens. I learned a lot about her and so will middle grade and high school readers.
Kyo Maclear is Canadian. 🍁


4 stars
Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer

I wish I hadn’t waited so long to get to this book, but at least I don’t have to wait forever for the sequel.
I appreciate that the book begins with a quick graphic recap of The Lunar Chronicles so I was reminded of the backstory.
At this time, Iko is now on earth tracking down and rounding up renegade Lunar wolf soldiers who are wreaking havoc on Earth. One of them has become an alpha leader and plans to force Queen Cinder to return them to their previous state.
I appreciated the tension between Kinney and Iko and can hardly wait to find out what happens next!

NOVELS


4 stars
Just Lucky by Melanie Florence

Just Lucky is a brilliant book that looks at the life of an indigenous teen who has to cope with a grandmother with Alzheimers and a series of foster homes. I cried, more than once.
Melanie Florence is Indigenous Canadian. 🍁


5 stars
Pay Attention, Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt

Cricket comes to America in this book. It comes by way of August Paul Bowles-Fitzpatrick, Butler extraordinaire, to Marysville, New York and the family of Carter Jones. Butler is there for them when the family need him most. This is especially true for Carter, who is coming of age against a backdrop of all kinds of family hardships.
I laughed. I cried. I loved this book.

"Make good decisions and remember who loves you."
I looked at him. "I thought it was 'remember who you are.'"
The Butler looked back at me. "It is the very same thing," he said...
"We are what we love, young Master Carter."


4 stars
Glass Houses by Louise Penny

Gamache is now head of the Sûreté du Québec.  Acknowledging that they have lost the war on drugs, Gamache and a few trusted senior officers come up with a plan to take on the main crime syndicate in that province. It doesn't take long for them to realize that the murder of the cobrador visiting Three Pines intersects with their plans.
If you read this, make sure to read the author notes at the end of the book.
Louise Penny is Canadian. 🍁

POETRY


4 stars
Our Familiar Hunger by Laisha Rosnau

These profound poems provide an overview of immigration from the Ukraine area to Canada. The poems from earlier times tell of the hardships women endured and how those experiences are manifest in later generations. They connected me to my ethnically German great grandmothers who also immigrated to the Canadian prairies from the Odessa region in the early 1900's. The poems of recent emigration from the area are heartbreaking stories of desperation and different variations of sexual slavery. I can't help but acknowledge that had my ancestors not made that journey, I could have been one of them.
Laisha Rosnau is Canadian. 🍁

CURRENTLY

On my device I'm reading Beverly, Right Here by Kate DiCamillo and The Squatchicorns by Ellen Potter. I'm still reading This Was Logging by Ralph W. Andrews, and have started The Creativity Project by Colby Sharp. The poetry I'm in the middle of is Rooster Summer by Robert Heidbreder. I've just started Strangers by David Robertson. I'm listening to The Next Great Paulie Fink.

UP NEXT

I plan to get to more of my Netgalley titles but also have a pile of books from my local library. I'm hoping to read The Very Very Far North by Dan Bar-el, What the Eagle Sees by Eldon Yellowhorn and After Life: Ways We Think About Death by Merrie-Ellen Wilcox.

PROGRESS ON MY READING GOALS

#MustReadIn2018 22/25 - one in progress

#MustReadNFIn2018 11/12

25 Books by Canadian Indigenous Authors 19/25 - one in progress

25 books by Canadian Authors 58/25

Big Book Reading Challenge 10/4

Goodreads Reading Challenge 299/333

The House at the End of the Road by Kari Rust

Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It was published September 17, 2019, by Owl Kids.

A young girl and her brother, Patrick, come to stay with their grandmother for the summer. Robert, their cousin, is there already. Right from the start, it was Robert who most fascinated me. He still does. There’s just something about him that tells you he’s a unique character who is full of all kinds of surprises.

The trio of cousins decide to visit the rickety old house at the end of the road. When Robert throws a rock at the window, a face appears. Certain it is a ghost, they run away leaving one of their bikes behind.



After they tell their grandmother, she drags them off to the house to apologize to  Mr. Peterson, her favourite teacher and owner of the house. He’s quite the character with a delightfully wacky sense of humour as you can see below as he greets his visitors for the first time.


Over time they visit with Mr. Peterson numerous times. He gives them gifts that are perfect for each of them. This relationship benefits all of them, but it seems that it is most important for Robert who is most devastated when they discover their elderly friend is gone. 


The House at the end of the road is a hybrid – part picture book and part graphic novel. There is much I love about it, but mostly it’s the characters. The adults are responsible, but kind and loving. The children are authentic. I’ve had a few Roberts in my teaching life and wish all of them could have significant role models like Mr. Peterson and Grandma.

I adore the art in this book. It’s gorgeously detailed. So much is revealed about the countryside where this takes place and about the characters and their emotions. There is a seamless union of image and words. Separating one from the other in this book is impossible. 

This book confirmed for me the importance of acceptance for all children. It reminded me of the special relationships I am lucky enough to have with my own grandchildren and of how important relationships between the oldest and the youngest of us are.

My only quibble with this book is the APPEARANCES ARE DECEIVING message at the end of it. Not only is it not necessary, it simplifies all the important nuances of meaning the book holds.

Your school library should have a copy of this one. 

Just Lucky by Melanie Florence

Thanks to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book. It was published September 17, 2019, by Second Story Press.

My parents, who had five children of their own, took in one of my brother's teen friends, Bobby, as a foster kid. That boy was broken. My father was a stay at home Dad after an accident that left him paralyzed from the waist down.  Someone was always there if you needed help. We offered Bobby as much love as we could. It wasn't enough.

In my twenties I worked with teens who were in care. Most of them were girls who had been sexually abused in their homes, and for some, the abuse continued in foster homes.

There is a shortage of good foster homes, especially for teens. I have known this since then. I wish that we had opened up our home up for kids who needed them. But my partner and I both worked full time. I worked with children all day, and felt I couldn't deal with more our own two when I got home.

My cousin and his partner, two of the people I admire most in the world, have fostered over 30 children. They make a commitment to those kids and make them part of their family forever. Family get togethers are quite the event.

You are probably wondering why I'm going on about foster care here. It's because of this book. It's because I know the truth in Melanie Florence's novel.

Lucky is a smart young teen who lives with her Cree grandparents. Her mother, an addict, is incapable of taking care of her, but she has a good life. Her best friend, Ryan, lives nearby. Grandma has been getting more and more forgetful, but Grandpa is there to help out and look after her. When he dies unexpectedly, Lucky tries to take care of her, but then Grandma almost burns the house down and is diagnosed with Alzheimers. Grandma ends up in a home and Lucky ends up in the foster system.

As soon as Lucky landed in her first placement, I had to put the book down. I needed to prepare myself for what was about to happen. Unfortunately she ends up in four homes before finally ending up in a place that works for her.

In spite of the difficulties Lucky has to endure, she is blessed with a good friend in Ryan who she has known since they were little. While in care Lucky manages to befriend many other children. I loved that it was often through a shared love of graphic novels and comic books. Through them we come to know the gamut of experiences that land kids in care in the first place.

I appreciate the diverse characters in this book. I appreciate that Florence shows us the racism that Lucky has to endure and how many adults just don't understand it.

While I think this book is appropriate for students aged twelve and up, my wish is that teachers and other adults will read it. At the least they will understand what it means for the children they work with who are in care. At best, maybe they will decide to open up their own homes.

Poetry Friday September 20, 2019

Poetry Friday is hosted today by retired teacher, poet, and volunteer coordinator at a local used bookstore, Linda Bai at TeacherDance. Today she is showing off Dictionary for a Better World - Poems, Quotes, and Anecdotes from A to Z, an exciting new book by Irene Latham and Charles Waters with illustrations by Mehrdokht Amini. Go over there and read about it. Don't forget to check out the links to other participants sharing poetry today.

Just a reminder that Carol Varsalona and I have switched hosting dates. Carol will be hosting September 27, 2019 at Beyond LiteracyLink, and I will take on her date, October 4, 2019, here at Library Matters.


In 1958, I was five when my family joined other relatives on a logging and homesteading adventure into the Pine River region of Northern British Columbia.
I'm committed to sharing a bit every week so that I don't give up. (with time out for camping and canning of course) I appreciate feedback on the construction of the poetry and ideas and questions about what information might be missing. 

I am almost done. This one here is long. I am sure that by the time I am done it will end up being a number of poems. 

RETURN

neighbours,
understanding the
somber significance
of Uncle Wilf’s
afternoon visit,
dropped in,
wept with my mother,
and offered comfort
with action

supplied supper
and breakfast
minded the baby and kids
helped pack up essentials

------

Mary and Adam Weichel,
my paternal grandparents,
drove through the night,
arrived early the next morning
in their Nash Statesman

Uncle Cliff,
one of Daddy’s little brother’s
just sixteen
with a brand new driver’s license
arrived with them
to drive us and our rambler south

trimmed down to
fundamentals
everything and everybody
was packed into the two vehicles

barely four months
after our arrival,
we began the journey
back the way we had come

------

Mother Nature offered
what comfort she could

ghost white landscapes
monitored our departure

evergreens shrouded in snow
and bare branched aspens
solemnly guided and guarded
our procession south

storm clouds parted
left sanded dirt roads
temporarily alone

sunshine blessed us
as best it could
Lord knows,
     we had rain enough
     inside us

------

at Clinton, we overnighted
with Peggy and Maurice

Gramma and Grampa 
took no break,
continued on southwest
towards Vancouver,
towards Daddy,

still hanging on.

----

early the next day
Uncle Cliff returned us 
to our home town

Mommy dropped us off
with Aunty Dorothy and Uncle Bob
kept Timmy, who was still nursing,

Her folks, 
Isobel and Walter
drove them west
towards Vancouver,
towards Daddy,

in critical condition,

but still alive.


Here are links to previous poems in this collection.

Leaving
Characters
Journey
Arrival
Preparedness
Ready and Willing
Larder
Laundry
Diaper Duty
Skunk Trouble
Working
Pawns
Crossing
Bath Time
invincible 
Explorer
Time For Fun
First Snow

Miserable Physics

Difficult Decision

#IMWAYR September 16, 2019

#IMWAYR time again, when readers share what they have been reading and find out what others have been up to in the past week. Kathryn hosts the adult version of this meme at Book Date. Jen at Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers host the kidlit rendition. Whatever you are looking forward to in your next great read, these are fabulous places to start your search.

I've missed a couple of weeks. First I went camping with friends away from internet. We were in the middle of a forest beside a gorgeous lake. I wish I had thought to take a photograph or two, but I was too busy reading, swimming and visiting. Then we arrived home to 250 pounds of ripe tomatoes ready for preserving. It was a good thing I lazed around while camping, because I put in ten hour days canning tomatoes, making juice, salsa and sauce. Thank goodness for audiobooks!




If you clink on the title link it will take you to the book's Goodreads page.

BLOG POSTS LAST WEEK

Poetry Friday August 30, 2019: Miserable Physics
Poetry Friday September 12, 2019
#MustReadIn2019 September Update
Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson
And Then the Seed Grew by Marianne Dubuc

PICTURE BOOKS



4 stars
And Then the Seed Grew by Marianne Dubuc

When I got over my difficulty reading this on my ipad because of formatting issues, I ended up enchanted by this book.  Like all of Duboc's work, it's fascinating and a bit mind bending. Readers can spend a lot of time poring over the artwork and pondering meanings. You can read my full review at the link above.
Marianne Dubuc is a Canadian author.🍁

3 stars
Bedtime for Monsters by Ed Vere

This isn't my favourite Ed Vere book. It's a little bit too dark and twisted for me. While I was reading it I anticipated my 2 1/2 year old grandkids reaction to a monster coming to eat them. I don't think it will lead to sweet dreams. That said, I suspect that more sophisticated readers might find it hilarious.

5 stars
Gondra's Treasure by Linda Sue Park

I might love this more than others will because the story fits my granddaughter's life. Her mother is Korean and her father is a mixture of all kinds of backgrounds, primarily German. Their daughter is like like the child dragon in this story, half east and half west. She is our treasure, just like Gondra is theirs.
There is too much text on the page to entertain a two year old, but the two of us enjoyed looking at the gorgeous artwork. She pointed to the little dragon and called it Ada dragon and identified the adults as Mommy and Daddy. She loved the flying images and claimed that she would fly someday. I guess that's enough for her age.

5 stars
The Monster at the End of this Book by Jon Stone & Michael J. Smollin (Illustrator)

This was a favourite of both my sons when they were young, so it was a delight to introduce my 2 1/2 year old granddaughter to it. At our first reading, she told me she was scared of monsters. The next time she made me stop reading because she didn't want to get to the end of the book. I'm certain Grover loved her for it. However, in the space of 48 hours, we probably read this book 6 times. I'm not sure if she understands it, or if it's just that she likes Grandma reading with all that expression.

5 stars
Up the Mountain Path by Marianne Dubuc

This is a picture book for all ages. Every Sunday Mrs. Badger hikes to the top of Sugarloaf Peak. One day a young cat, Lulu, approaches her and Mrs Badger encourages her to come along. During their weekly treks she schools the cat on how to live in harmony with the environment and live a rich and satisfying life. When Mrs Badger can no longer make the climb, Lulu continues without her, but always returns to tell how what she saw. Eventually Lulu is shown taking a young rabbit to the top.
I have climbed to the top of a high mountain and looked up at the world in 360 degree magnificence, and completely understand why "Lulu doesn't say a word. She's on top of the world."
This book is satisfying on so many levels. The artwork is sublime. The deeply philosophical message scratches my itch for profundity in children's picture books. It's a beautiful story highlighting the cycle of life and our responsibilities towards others.
Marianne Dubuc is a Canadian author.🍁

NOVELS

3 stars
The Boy At the Back of the Class by Onjali Q. Rauf

I like this book a lot. It’s the story of a group of children who go out of their way to help a new student in their classroom. It turns out that he is a refugee who has arrived in Britain without his parents. His four new friends get themselves into a mess of trouble trying to reunite them, but fortunately it all works out in the end.
I like the message behind this book. Children are much more accepting than adults. I liked that we don’t know the gender of the protagonist till near the end. I appreciated the supportive teachers and parents these children have.
I do have a few quibbles. These characters seem very young for their age so I’m not sure how this will work for older readers. I also wonder about navigating the British cultural aspects and nomenclature for North American readers.

5 stars
Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo & Roger Clark, Jay Snyder, Elizabeth Evans, Fred Berman, Brandon Rubin, Kevin T. Collins, Lauren Fortgang, Peter Ganim (Narrators)

This is the second in the Six of Crows series. If possible, I loved it even more than the first. All the characters are at least slightly damaged by circumstances before they became members of the Dregs, a street gang run by one of them. We learn much more about each of them in this novel. Give me good characters and I can read just about anything. This book has that and all kinds of adventure, excitement, and intrigue. I sure hope Leigh Bardugo hurries up and gets the next one written soon!
Listening to the audio has the feel of a radio play because the different characters are narrated by different actors.

5 stars
Lies Sleeping (Rivers of London #7) by Ben Aaronovitch & Kobna Holdbrook-Smith (Narrator)

I read this with my eyes last February, but as soon as my library brought in the audio, I put it on hold. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith is Peter Grant. I am infatuated with the character and his voice. Everyone I recommend this series to ends up adoring it. Give it a try!

3.5 stars
Naked Mole Rat Saves the World by Karen Rivers

kit, deliberately spelled without a capital letter, is a young girl who is already grappling with too much. Turning into a naked mole rat when she gets stressed doesn't exactly help. I liked a lot about this quirky novel, but all the issues seemed overwhelming.
I am in the middle of writing a more detailed review, which I'll publish next week.
Karen Rivers is a Canadian author.🍁

5 stars
Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson

The most important thing you need to know about this book is that the writing is so beautiful it made me ache. These characters, as flawed and fabulous as they are, will claim a place in your heart. What more do you need in a book?
You can read my full review at the link above.

4 stars
The Theory of Hummingbirds by Michelle Kadarusman

Alba is an inspirational character for elementary aged readers. She has a goal to run the school’s annual two km run. The problem is that she’s still wearing a cast from her most recent surgery to correct her clubfoot. Her best friend, Levi, has his own issues with asthma. The two of them suspect that their teacher librarian has a wormhole in her office.
Alba works very hard to get her new foot in shape for the run and ends up being successful even if it wasn’t what she first wanted.
I loved the characters in this novel. The adults are caring and responsible. Alba’s concerns about her peers laughing at her turn out to be unfounded. On the contrary, they end up being very supportive.
Michelle Kadarusman is a Canadian author.🍁

5 stars
A Wolf Called Wander by Rosanne Parry & Mónica Armiño (Illustrator)

I sat down and devoured this in one sitting. It is a beautiful read from start to finish. It's the story of a young wolf, Swift, who ends up separated from his family. He travels a long distance before finding a new place to call home and changing his name. I love that it is told from his perspective. I appreciated the black and white illustrations.
The back matter is full of information about OR-7 the real wolf the story is based on. It also includes pages full of details about other animals, wolves in general, and the 1000 mile journey OR-7 traveled alone.
If I was still teaching I would be reading this one to my class ASAP.

4 stars
The Nature of the Beast (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache #11) by Louise Penny & Robert Bathurst (Narrator)

A young boy's murder sends Gamache and the citizens of Three Pines searching the past for the creator of a deadly weapon, and into the present for who might be wanting to keep it a secret.
I worried about whether or not this audiobook would work for me since Ralph Cosham, who narrated the previous books, died of cancer after finishing The Long Way Home. It didn't take long before I was believing in Robert Bathurst's voice as Gamache.

4 stars
A Great Reckoning (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache #12) by Louise Penny & Robert Bathurst (Narrator)

Gamache takes a job as head of the Sûreté academy in an effort to change the way cadets are trained. He ends up dealing with a murder and moves four young cadets, who were involved with the victim, to Three Pines to protect them. By the end of the book, I was only sorry that the victim died so quickly.

I think it's pretty evident that I am addicted to this series. I'm already listening to the next one.

NONFICTION

5 stars
March: Book Two by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin (Goodreads Author), Nate Powell (Illustrator)

It's one thing to know about something in a kind of abstract way. It's a different thing completely to delve more deeply into it. Book Two brings the reader into an intimate awareness of what it meant to be a Freedom Rider. It's not easy to be there. I couldn't read this book without again and again setting it aside for a few minutes to catch my breath and let my fear and fury ease off.

CURRENTLY

I'm reading Just Lucky by Melanie Florence on my device. The nonfiction title I have on the go is This Was Logging by Ralph W. Andrews. I'm listening to Glass Houses by Louise Penny.

UP NEXT

I plan to get to Operatic by Kyo Maclear, Pay Attention, Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt, and Wires and Nerve by Marissa Meyer. I'm also hoping to get to another netgalley title, Beverly, Right Here by Kate DiCamillo.

PROGRESS ON MY READING GOALS

#MustReadIn2018 21/25

#MustReadNFIn2018 11/12

25 Books by Canadian Indigenous Authors 18/25 - one in process

25 books by Canadian Authors 53/25

Big Book Reading Challenge 10/4

Goodreads Reading Challenge 289/333