#IMWAYR July 15, 2019

#IMWAYR time again, when readers share what they have been reading and find out what others have been up to in the past week. Kathryn hosts the adult version of this meme at Book Date. Jen at Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers host the kidlit rendition. Whatever you are looking forward to in your next great read, these are fabulous places to start your search.


The weather improved last week so I managed to get out into the garden. It looks pretty good if you don't examine it too closely. Gardening might be a lot of work, but we love going out into our backyard and picking our dinner.


The true miracle of the week was getting my sewing room tidy. I needed to get it under control so I could finish a quilt. I got the pieced binding machine stitched so all I have left to do is the hand sewing. It's going to be hard to give this one away. I'll post a picture next week if I get it finished.


Clicking on the title to the following books will take you to the Goodreads page for that book.


RECENT BLOG POSTS


Poetry Friday July 12, 2019 Bath Night


PICTURE BOOKS



5 stars
Peek-a-Boo Zoo! by Jane Cabrera

I picked this up at a library story time and checked it out because my grandson sat down to read it with me without any persuasion. It's a simple repetitive rhyme scheme that doesn't really work for me, but sure pleases my grandkids. Truthfully, it's all about those eyes and turning the page to see who's there. We've been reading it pretty regular these days. Ada screams with delight each time she sees the next set of eyes.


NOVELS



5 + stars
The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart & Khristine Hvam (Narrator)

I love love love this book. Coyote and her dad, Rodeo, are two characters I will be carrying with me for a long time. As they travel around the country in their renovated bus, the pick up a diverse collection of brilliant secondary characters. Their destinations might be different, but here they are united in love and friendship. This novel is a powerful look at loss and healing and that bus is a powerful analogy for the earth. My eyes leaked a lot. There might even have been some ugly crying.



4 stars
Orange for the Sunsets by Tina Athaide

I've been wanting to read this book for a while because I have a friend who's family had to leave Uganda when Idi Amin came to power. We are lucky to have him and his family here in Canada. Also, Ms Yingling gave it 5 stars on Goodreads. 

Previously, Asha and her best friend, Yesofu, didn't acknowledge the differences between them. Then a decree was proclaimed that all Indians must leave the country in 90 days. As the days to expulsion count down, violence against Indians increases. People who were once friends turn against them. Asha doesn't want to have to leave and does something that ends up costing her more than she could imagine.
Tina Athaide has done a brilliant job highlighting the disparity between the two main protagonists. Asha, a young Indian girl, has no idea how privileged she is compared to Yesofu and his African family. I also appreciate how she showed us readers the complexity of the situation.
Tina Athaide makes her home in Canada. 


4 stars
Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga & Vaneh Assadourian (Narrator)

When Syria become too dangerous for Jude and her pregnant mother, they travel to America to be with her mom's brother and family. There is authentic tension between Jude and her cousin for all kinds of reasons. I loved all the complex characters in the extended family.

This is an important book to help Canadian and American children come to a deeper understanding of what it means to be a refugee.
I listened to this instead of reading it with my eyes. I think I will have to find a hard copy to read as mentor text for the verse project I am working on.


5 stars
The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner

This is the kind of YA coming of age novel I adore. It’s got rich characters dealing with important stuff. The relationship between the three protagonists is authentic. I was invested in each of them and couldn’t stop reading. I wept buckets.

There is so much going on. I appreciated how Zentner unpacks religious fundamentalism to show us the pitfalls, at the same time as he highlights a more loving and accepting version of Christianity.
That said, I don’t care how good the book is, I am too old to stay awake reading till 4:30 in the morning.

CURRENTLY


I've started Lost Girl by Anne Ursu and am listening to A Trick of the Light (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache #7) by Louise Penny. I haven't made much progress on Some Places More Than Others by Renée Watson because I don't like reading on my iPad. However, I will try to get it finished this week!


UP NEXT


I've got a lot of books to get through before they go back to the library so I will have to hunker down and carve out some reading time. Here's what I need to plow through in the next four days: Outside in: A Political Memoir by Libby Davies; Takedown by Laura Shovan; and With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo. There is also a pile of picture books. 


PROGRESS ON MY READING GOALS


#MustReadIn2018 15/25 1 in progress


#MustReadNFIn2018 9/12


25 Books by Canadian Indigenous Authors 16/25


25 books by Canadian Authors 33/25


Big Book Reading Challenge 4/4


Goodreads Reading Challenge 221/333

Poetry Friday, July 12. 2019

This week's Poetry Friday roundup is hosted by poet, Jone Rush MacCulloch at Deowriter. Go and have a look at the fabulous poetry fortune generator she received and make sure to check out the links to other participants sharing poetry today.



I am still working on poems from 1958, when my family joined other relatives on an adventure into the Pine Valley region in Northern British Columbia. I'm committed to sharing a bit every week to keep me going. They might not be in any kind of order. I just hope to get some kind of drafts out there. I appreciate feedback on the construction of the poetry and ideas and questions about what information might be missing.

I've got four or five more sections left I think. Then I expect I'll go back and rewrite all of it.

BATH TIME

In summer
formal baths
were unheard of.
Getting cleaned up was
as simple as
sudsing and
splashing in the river.

A basin of soapy water
was always on hand
for quick cleanups,
washing hands before meals,
and removing the worst of the dirt
before bed.

With the onset of fall,
the weather turned cold,
the river colder.

We got bathed
formally,
'bout once a week.

Water was hauled up,
heated on the stove
and poured into
a galvanized square washtub.

Everyone in the family
bathed in the same water.
The baby went first,
then us kids got our turn.

One evening
I was lucky enough to
be second in line.

Mommy washed my hair
and made sure
the rest of me was
scrubbed up good
before wrapping me in a towel
to dry off.

Even with the wood stove blazing,
It was still frigid in the kitchen.

The towel covered my
shoulders and torso,
but that’s all.

Hugging it around me,
I backed up towards
the heat,
wanting to
warm my backside.

Be careful,
My mother warned.

Ignoring her,
I edged my rear
nearer to the warmth,
until
I backed my bottom
right up against
fiery hot cast iron.

hssss

Seared the skin right off.

Hurt like the devil.

But I don’t actually
remember that part,
only mortification.

I suppose I am left with a scar,
but luckily,
it's all behind me.

#IMWAYR JULY 8, 2019

#IMWAYR time again, when readers share what they have been reading and find out what others have been up to in the past week. Kathryn hosts the adult version of this meme at Book Date. Jen at Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers host the kidlit rendition. Whatever you are looking forward to in your next great read, these are fabulous places to start your search.


The weather last week in my part of the world has been overcast, wet, and cool. My garden is out of control, but I am a fair-weather gardener, so I'm leaving it alone til I get better working conditions. Besides, the raspberries and strawberries are kind of tasteless without sun. 
On the positive side, I've had lots of time for reading and writing. I should try to get the chaos that is my sewing room under control. I keep going in and looking at the disaster, then shutting the door and ignoring it. Maybe I will get to it this week. 
I'm writing this early Sunday morning because the family is coming over for supper tonight and I expect I will be too exhausted by the time they leave to start then. I doubt I will have finished anything, but hope to squeeze some reading time in of some kind or another. 

Clinking on the title to the following books will take you to the Goodreads page for that book.

RECENT BLOG POSTS

Poetry Friday July 5, 2019: Crossing

PICTURE BOOKS


5 stars
Charlie & Mouse Even Better by Laurel Snyder & Emily Hughes (Illustrator)

I love love love this series.
I love this family. I love the humour. I adore Emily Hughes illustrations.
Pancakes, birthday shopping and a special cake for mom fill these three stories.
Unfortunately my grandkids won't sit still for this much text on a page, but I did catch Ada browsing through the book on her own.


5 stars
Wish by Matthew Cordell

Just wow!
I did not have to wait for children, but my son and daughter in law did. This book could have been written for them. I'm sure many other parents will think it is for them.
What I can tell you is that our granddaughter, Ada, was worth waiting for.

NOVELS


3 stars
Archenemies (Renegades #2) by Marissa Meyer, Dan Bittner (Narrator) & Rebecca Soler (Narrator)

I liked the beginning of this book well enough. Then it went on and on with all kinds of teenage romantic angst. I really liked the first book in the series, so saying this saddens me. I increased the speed of the audiobook just to get it finished. I won’t be reading the next in the trilogy unless hell freezes over.
Of course, I’m too old to be the target audience anyway so you should probably ignore this review.


5 stars
The Benefits of Being An Octopus by Ann Braden

This book made me anxious while reading it. That's a testimony to how well it is written.
Zoey, her mother, and three younger siblings, live with her mom's boyfriend, Larry. There are many good things about living there, but her mother has changed from the courageous, confident woman she once was.
While life at home is hard, and Zoey has a lot of responsibility for her younger siblings, she is lucky to be seen by one of her teachers, Ms Rochambea. Ms Rochambeau makes sure Zoey becomes a member of debate club, and does her best to help Zoey become more sure of herself.

This book takes a close look at what it means to live in poverty. By the end, readers will be rooting for Zoey to find a way to lift herself above her beginnings.


4 stars
DreadfulWater Shows Up by Thomas King (writing as Hartley GoodWeather)

I am enjoying this mystery series featuring Cheroke Indian, Thumps Dreadfulwater, an  ex cop turned art photographer. It's hilarious that he continues to be a sleuth whether he wants to be or not. I read Cold Skies (the third one) first. I loved the characters then, and found it fascinating meeting them as they were presented in the first novel.
I loved the humour, the suspense, and the convoluted plot. I've already put a hold on the second book.



5 stars
A Good Kind of Trouble by Lisa Moore Ramée,

The United Nations consists of Shay, Julia, and Isabella. All three girls come from separate ethnic backgrounds but have been best friends since they were in grade three. Their first year at middle school brings all kinds of obstacles and opportunities. Surviving with their friendship still intact might be their biggest challenge.
Shayla is one of those memorable characters you meet in middle grade fiction. She's an authentic kid with a big heart caught up in normal kinds of friendship issues against the backdrop of another shooting of a black man by police.

NONFICTION


5 stars
The Hunting Accident: A True Story of Crime by David L. Carlson & Landis Blair (Illustrations)

There are a lot of pages in this graphic novel but I anticipated it would be a relatively easy read. I was wrong. It is so intense that I could only read chunks of it at a time. It's the story of Matt Rizzo, a young blind man who in the 1930s ends up in prison. As much as he wanted to die, he connected with another nefarious prisoner who helped him find redemption through reading Dante's Inferno and writing poetry.
After he was paroled, he kept his past a secret, married and had a child. The marriage fell apart when his secret was revealed. It's only when his son, Charlie, begins to follow the gangster path, that he tells the truth about his history.
David L. Carlson has included Matt Rizzo's own words in this biography. Landis Blair's darkly detailed, gritty art integrates the text in such a way that you have to spend time absorbing them. It's the combination that makes the book so profound.

CURRENTLY

I am listening to The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart. I'm reading The Serpent King by Jeff Zentnerin in book format and as an ebook from Netgalley, Some Places More Than Others by Renée Watson. I'm forcing myself to savour, and not speed through Salt by Nayyirah Waheed. Her poetry is just stunning.

UP NEXT

I'm hoping to get to Lost Girl by Anne Ursu, Orange for the Sunsets by Tina Athaide and  listening to Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga as my next audiobook.

PROGRESS ON MY READING GOALS

#MustReadIn2018 13/25 2 in progress

#MustReadNFIn2018 9/12

25 Books by Canadian Indigenous Authors 16/25

25 books by Canadian Authors 32/25

Big Book Reading Challenge 4/4

Goodreads Reading Challenge 216/333

Poetry Friday July 5, 2019

This week's Poetry Friday roundup is hosted by educator and poet, Tricia Stohr-Hunt at The Miss Rumphius Effect. Go and read her triolet and make sure to check out the links to other participants sharing poetry today.

I am continuing to work on poems from 1958, when my family joined other relatives on an adventure into the Pine Valley region in Northern British Columbia. I'm committed to sharing a bit every week to keep me going. They might not be in any kind of order. I just hope to get some kind of drafts out there. I appreciate feedback on the construction of the poetry and ideas and questions about what information might be missing.

Today's poem combines a memory of mine about crossing the swollen Pine River with a memory from my Uncle Bill.

CROSSING

Gorged on autumn rain,
the Pine River
churned and roiled
ravenous waves licking
at the bridge deck,
readying to devour it whole.

Timothy was sick,
getting worse,
might not make it,
had to 
see a doctor,
had to
chance the river,
cross the bridge,
make a trip
to Prince George.

Mommy got us
kids ready to go.

Waiting
in the car,
I watched
adults determine
the least dangerous
way to cross.

Searching
their anxious faces
for sign of
comfort,
assurance,

found none.

Heard only
the snarling roar
of the hungry torrent.

Finally,
a decision was made.

Out of the car we tumbled.

Mommy held
the bundled up baby
in one arm and
the hand of James
in the other.

Squeezing hard onto
the hands of
my two younger sisters,
one on either side of me,
we traversed the trembling span,
terrified it would rip apart
beneath us.

On the other side,
fear abated as
we turned to watch
the station wagon,
driven by my uncle,
ease it’s way
across the bridge.



Links to previous poems are here:

Leaving

Characters

Journey

Arrival

Preparedness 

Ready and Willing 

Larder

Laundry

Diaper Duty

Skunk Trouble

Working

Pawns

#IMWAYR July 1, 2019

#IMWAYR time again, when readers share what they have been reading and find out what others have been up to in the past week. Kathryn hosts the adult version of this meme at Book Date. Jen at Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers host the kidlit rendition. Whatever you are looking forward to in your next great read, these are fabulous places to start your search.



Hurrah for summer vacation!
Here in Canada, July 1st is Canada Day, so Happy Canada Day to everyone! My partner, Randy, and I are in our house in Oliver, BC. The weather isn't as hot as we expected, so Randy is getting some work done while I focus on resting, relaxing and reading. I've managed a bit of writing too.

Clinking on the title will take you to the Goodreads page for that book. 

RECENT BLOG POSTS

Poetry Friday June 28, 2019

PICTURE BOOKS


5 stars
Hope by Matthew Cordell

This book is just beautiful. As a grandparent, it gave me all the feels.
I planned on reading it to a group of kindergarteners. Before starting it, I asked them what they hoped for. After I finally just asked those who hoped for Pokemon cards to put up their hands, we got on to other hopes. I was honoured by their big wishes for the world, their families and each other. They might be little, but they are a force to be reckoned with. We never did get to the book.

NOVELS


4 stars
The Case of Windy Lake by Michael Hutchinson

The Mighty Muskrats are a group of four indigenous cousins who live on their reserve and solve mysteries. In this first novel they are trying to figure out what happened to a missing archaeologist.
What jumped out at me was the profound respect these children show towards their elders, as well as how those same elders are there for them.
There is much to adore about this beginning series. The cousins end up solving this case through a combination of internet research and knowledge learned from these elders.
I appreciated that the the conflict between corporate interests and the people's claims over their land and resources are addressed in a complex, yet positive way that embeds indigenous learning and ways of knowing.
I'll be looking forward to the next in the series!
Michael Hutchinson is Indigenous Canadian, 


4 stars
Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

This book wasn't as stunning as the first, because it wasn't all gloriously new. I am still hooked on this series though. Murderbot is a fabulous character. I can hardly wait to read the next one, Rogue Protocol!


4 stars
Shouting at the Rain by Lynda Mullaly Hunt

I finished this book in one sitting (well almost anyway.) I resented the time I had to take away from it to set the table.
This is a story of how it takes a community to raise a child. I loved these authentic characters! Delsie has some solid friends in her small vacation town. When her summer friend, Brandy, takes up with a mean girl, Delsie has to learn how to let go of that relationship. Thankfully, she connects with Ronan, a young boy new to the area. I appreciate how her friendship with Ronan evolves and that the two of them are able to help each other. I adore Delsie's Grammy. Her wisdom is the kind all elders should have.

Some authors write books with chapters that leave you hanging on a cliff edge, desperate to read more. Lynda Mullaly Hunt's chapters end with universal truths, leaving the reader pondering life's big ideas. They also make you ravenous for more.

NONFICTION

I've been reading a lot of logging history for a memoir I'm working on. It's been fascinating. The best part is reading the stories of the different individuals. I'm not done with these yet, but here's what I'm exploring a lot of these days.

More Deadly Than War: Pacific Coast Logging 1827 - 1981 by Andrew Mason Prouty
It's full of stories of hardship and disaster. In the middle of it I found some unexpected poetry.

First Growth: The story of British Columbia Forest Products Limited by Sue Baptie

Tie Hackers to Timber Harvesters: The History of Logging in BC's Interior by Ken Drushka

CURRENTLY

I am still listening to Archenemies (Renegades #2) by Marissa Meyer. I'm finding the romance makes the book drag for me. I'm reading The Hunting Accident: A True Story of Crime by David L. Carlson.

UP NEXT

Before we return home, I'm hoping to finish The Benefits of Being An Octopus by Ann Braden and DreadfulWater Shows Up by Thomas King (writing as Hartley GoodWeather).

I finally figured out how to get Netgalley books downloaded onto my iPad so I plan to get to at least one of those this coming week.

PROGRESS ON MY READING GOALS

#MustReadIn2018 13/25

#MustReadNFIn2018 8/12 1 in progress

25 Books by Canadian Indigenous Authors 15/25

25 books by Canadian Authors 31/25

Big Book Reading Challenge 2/4 2 in progress

Goodreads Reading Challenge 210/333

Poetry Friday June 28, 2019

This week's Poetry Friday roundup is hosted by Buffy Silverman, author of numerous nonfiction titles for children. She's reviewing a charming nonfiction picture book, written in verse, about a baby crane. Have a gander (sorry, I couldn't help it) and then enjoy her poem giving advice to a young check. Make sure to check out the links to other participants sharing poetry today.



I'm still working on poems from around 1958 when my family joined other relatives on an adventure into the Pine Valley region in Northern British Columbia.  

In today's poem I'm trying to distill a decade or so of history into a few lines. Huge changes were made in how forests were managed. These macro interventions had profound consequences for individuals working in the bush. 

Pawns 

They didn't know it, but
they were caught up
in the middle of a war.

A corrupt forestry minister
set trouble in motion.
Paid off by
multinational corporations 
he gave away management of 
vast expanses of forested land.

Landed in the lockup, 
but
destroyed a collaborative,
gentlemanly approach of
sharing the wealth
of the forest.

Ended up pitting

small time
loggers
bush mill and
planer operations

against

large companies and
international enterprises.

A new regime tried to revise it,
auctioned off concessions

But

the damage had been done

large outfits had more money
more resources

less conscience

left the smaller ones
little but bones to pick.

Another mend was attempted.

Contracts were awarded
based on a quota method.
Quota was the average
of wood cut and processed
in the previous three years.

Being new to the area,
they had no quota.

Couldn’t afford to purchase one.

The day they repossessed
the one ton truck,
was the only time
anyone remembers
Uncle Walter swearing.


Here are links to previous Pine Valley poems. 
Leaving

Characters
Journey
Arrival
Preparedness
Ready and Willing
Larder
Laundry
Diaper Duty
Skunk Trouble 
Working

#IMWAYR June 24, 2019

#IMWAYR time again, when readers share what they have been reading and find out what others have been up to in the past week. Kathryn hosts the adult version of this meme at Book Date. Jen at Teach Mentor Texts and Kellee and Ricki at Unleashing Readers host the kidlit rendition. Whatever you are looking forward to in your next great read, these are fabulous places to start your search.



Here in British Columbia in Canada, we have one more week of school. I am thankful that I only intend to work two days.
I'm still not sure I will survive.
I haven't felt like doing much more than vegging out in front of the TV. 

I'm sharing a couple of weeks worth of books. We celebrated my grandchildren's second birthday party last weekend and had a house full of company. Then Sunday was Father's day so we had more hullabaloo then.

At work I have been weeding picture books that haven't been checked out in two years. If the title looks in good shape, I give it a read through and make a decision. Sometimes I hope that since we are getting rid of so many books, this one will shine and get circulated. Many of the books here today are 'rescued' from the recycling centre.

Clicking on the titles below will take you to the Goodreads page for that book.

RECENT BLOG POSTS

Poetry Friday June 21, 2019

Poetry Friday June 14, 2019

BOOKS I'M READING WITH THE GRANDKIDS



We are on a tear these days with Olivier Dunrea's Gossie and Friends series.
We've been reading, rereading, and rereading Gossie, Gossie and Gertie, Ollie the Stomper, Ruby and Rufus, and Jasper and Joop. The more I read, the more I appreciate the patterns in these little books. I'm recommending them to all the school libraries for beginning readers. Another favourite these days is The Wonders of the Color Wheel by Charles Ghigna & Jatkowska Ag (Illustrations) Ada can't get over the "Big Mess!" the painters make. 

PICTURE BOOKS


5 stars
A Princess of Great Daring by Tobi Hill-Meyer & Elenore Toczynski (Illustrator)

This is a fabulous book with a trans character. I love that the book is mostly about friends playing together creating their own adventure. That Jamie is a now a girl is really an insignificant part of the story.


4 stars
Some Things Are Scary by Florence Parry Heide & Jules Feiffer (Illustrator)

I first thought this book might be good for Halloween, but after my second read I realized that it has lots of potential for social and emotional development. 


3 stars
Li Minoush (Thomas and His Cat) by Bonnie Murray, Rita Flamand & Sheldon Dawson (Illustrator)

After a discussion with his friends about pets, Thomas goes home and asks his mom for one. They decide to get a cat. After his mother suggests that they name their kitten Minoush, he learns that it means cat in Michif.
Michif, the language of the Metis, a combination of Cree and French, is in serious decline. The story is told in both English and Michif. Sheldon Dawson's realistic paintings create a sense of intimacy to the book.
The back matter includes a Michif pronunciation guide. I appreciated the information on the back cover about Rita Flamand, a fluent speaking Metis woman, who created a written form of the language to keep it alive. Unfortunately this book is now out of print. 
All of these contributors are Canadian. Bonnie Murray and Rita Flamand are Metis. 


4 stars
Allison by Allen Say

This is an important book to include in your collection of books about families. Allison, an Asian girl, was adopted into a white family. This picture book deals with some of her struggles as she realizes that she does not look like her parents.


4 stars
I Can’t Have Bannock But The Beaver Has A Dam by Bernelda Wheeler & Herman Bekkering

This cumulative story of why a young boy can't have bannock is pure fun to read. It's wonderful for readers who enjoy If You Give a Mouse a Cookie kind of tales.
Two things I enjoyed about this book include: everyone wins - the boy and the beaver, and there is a recipe for bannock at the back of the book.
I liked Herman Bekkering's black and white art, but wish the illustrations were in colour.
Both of the contributors are Canadian. Bernelda Wheeler is indigenous.


5 stars
The Grandma Book by Todd Parr

Everything here is absolutely true.


5 stars
Me With You by Kristy Dempsey & Christopher Denise (Illustrator)

I pretty much love everything about this book. I love the rhyming poetry. I love the illustrations. I adore the message.
I picked this up because I thought it might be an appropriate book to read for Father's Day. The students and I were not sure if the You in this book is a father or grandfather.

NONFICTION PICTURE BOOKS


5 stars
Little People, BIG DREAMS: Emmeline Pankhurst by Mª Isabel Sánchez Vegara, Ana Sanfelippo (Illustrator)

One of the students brought this book in to share with me.
I loved it. Emmeline Pankhurst is one of the suffragettes we have to thank for getting women the right to vote. I appreciate that the book shows us how her early years with supportive, activist parents, led to her becoming who she eventually became. Our roots matter.
I also appreciated the timeline and additional information about her at the end of the book.


5 stars
I Am Jane Goodall (Ordinary People Change the World) by Brad Meltzer & Christopher Eliopoulos (Illustrator)

This book is a wonderful introduction to Jane Goodall's life. It's also important in that it reminds us that we are part of a larger community and that we are responsible for it.

NOVELS


4 stars
Cold Skies by Thomas King (Big Book - 464 pages)

Give me a good mystery and I'm satisfied. Throw in some of Thomas King's way with words and ironic sense of humour, and I'm almost over the moon.
DreadfulWater is a retired cop who now lives in the small town of Chinook, Montana where he tries his hand at art photography. His past is weighted down by the murders of his partner and her 10 year old daughter, an unsolved case that haunts him.
When bodies start piling up, the sheriff, who's just about to head off on vacation, does his best to convince DreadfulWater to take on the role of acting sheriff.
What works for me here is all the little details, the grumpy cat, DreadfulWater's lusting after a six burner gas stove, and all the quirkiness in the characters and reality of living in a small town. I just picked up the first in the series up and can hardly wait to get to it. 


4 stars
To Night Owl from Dogfish by Holly Goldberg Sloan (Goodreads Author), Meg Wolitzer

This is the Patent Trap story with a twist. When two gay fathers want their daughters to meet and get to know each other in preparation for blending their families, it starts out rocky, and gets worse. In the end, no matter what happens with their parents, these two girls will always be sisters.
I loved it. I loved the characters, all of them, especially Gaga, the grandmother we all need in our lives.

NONFICTION


5 stars
The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America by Thomas King

Listening to this read by Thomas King himself was as delightful as possible given the subject matter. As I read of the repeated land grabs and ongoing attempts to eliminate indigenous peoples, I’ve been struck by the fact that we are continuing to do this still today. I sure would like to hear what he has to say about members of the Canadian senate refusing to pass the UNDRIP bill.

CURRENTLY

I am listening to Archenemies (Renegades #2) by Marissa Meyer. I'm reading The Case of Windy Lake by Michael Hutchinson. I've been carrying around The Essential Gwendolyn Brooks by Gwendolyn Brooks for a while, but it's going to have to be returned to the library unfinished.

UP NEXT

I'm hoping to get to Artificial Condition by Martha Wells and The Benefits of Being An Octopus by Ann Braden, but we shall see how things go.

PROGRESS ON MY READING GOALS

#MustReadIn2018 13/25

#MustReadNFIn2018 8/12 in progress

25 Books by Canadian Indigenous Authors 14/25

25 books by Canadian Authors 31/25

Big Book Reading Challenge 2/4

Goodreads Reading Challenge 204/333